Tucker Talk

An+exclusive+interview+with+Tucker%0ACarlson%2C+conservative+television+host%0Aand+political+commentator%2C+on+his%0Athoughts+on+abortion.

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An exclusive interview with Tucker Carlson, conservative television host and political commentator, on his thoughts on abortion.

Interviewer: So you are anti-abortion, correct? 

Carlson: Well, I would first establish that it’s killing. You know, the question is, Is it killing? So if I mean in abortions, for the first period of gestation, the embryo and the fetus doesn’t have a detectable heartbeat, you could say. This is just part of the mother. In which case, it would be like an act, you know, having your appendix out or having a tumor removed. There’s really no moral reasons to be concerned about, if you if your appendix is inflamed and it’s gonna burst. Nobody would judge you for having it out. Right? It would be a medical procedure that you didn’t like, there’s no moral component to it at all. If there is irrefutable evidence, like a heartbeat that this is not a part of a woman’s body, this is a separate human being, then you have to ask, you know, is that killing?

Would I say is it killing? To have an abortion? I mean, I guess the people who are against this have to answer that question. Is it killing to abort a child whose heart is beating? And if it’s not, then tell me how it’s not. And if it is, then then we can talk about under what circumstances you know, it’s okay to kill somebody.

Interviewer: Do you believe in the death penalty?

Carlson: I am opposed to the death penalty. But by leaving that aside, I mean, there are certain circumstances where it’s okay to kill people. And really, there’s only one that I believe in and that’s self-defense. If you think it’s gonna kill you. You have a right to kill that person. It’s not okay to kill somebody because he’s inconvenient. You know, like, if someone is in your way, or someone is preventing you from getting what you want, or going to college or eating happy bytes, you know, that’s awful. But it doesn’t justify killing the person does it? Or maybe it does? I don’t know. That’s the question.

Interviewer: Do you believe that abortion directly affects you? Since you’re a man and you will never actually have to bear a child.

Carlson: I didn’t know only women can get pregnant. When did that happen? It’s not just women who can get pregnant. Do you think it’s only women can get pregnant? It’s people of the sex that have those hormones and men are able to get pregnant, they might not always identify as a woman.

Interviewer: Do you identify as being able to get pregnant though?

Carlson: No, I am not able to get pregnant. So I think that we can just I think it’s probably transphobic to say that only women can comment on abortion. 

Interviewer: But do you believe that you can comment on abortion because you don’t identify as someone who can get pregnant?

Carlson: I think as a moral human being I can comment on killing. I’ve never, you know, I’ve never been invaded. I’m not involved in a war. But I can certainly comment on wars. I mean, I’m not Syrian, but I can have a view of like, mass killings in Syria. it’s not really a very intelligent standard to say, just because it’s not happening to you. You can’t comment on it. I mean, that, you know, World War II didn’t happen to me. But I think it’s okay for me to have opinions on who was right and who was wrong, and what killing is justified and what killing wasn’t? Right?

So, I think all moral people have a right to make moral judgments, particularly about killing. I don’t think those are sex-specific. I don’t mean do women not have a right to comment on prostate cancer? I mean. That’s it. That’s not a real standard. It’s super simple. Is it killing? Or is it not? If it’s not killing, then it’s no more controversial than an appendectomy. If it is killing, that, it’s like a real conversation that we need to have. When is it okay to kill somebody?

Interviewer: On a separate note, can I just ask you your opinions on the feminist movement in general and the meaning of feminism to you?

Carlson: You know, that’s such a good question. I’ve kind of lost track. Interesting. That means, you know, I mean, when I was a kid, growing up in California, the feminist movement was a movement to secure equal rights for women, that you shouldn’t discriminate against people because of their sex. I’ve always believed that. I believe that then, I believe that now. So if that’s what feminism is, I’m totally for it. Feminism is a propaganda effort designed to convince young women that it’s better for them to work at some soulless investment bank than it is to have a family. I think that that’s scary corporate propaganda, and I’m opposed to it. 

Interviewer: I saw an article about what you recently said about women in the military: can I just hear what your explanation behind that was? The headline is, I think was women in the military are useless.

Carlson: The point of the military is to defend the country. Period. It’s not the point of the military to achieve some gender equity goal or racial diversity goal, the goal is to defend the country. And so the most capable people should be hired to do that. And if it’s 100%, female, or 100%, Trans Pacific Islanders, I really don’t care. I just want the most effective people. And anytime you start hiring on the basis of criteria that are irrelevant, then you’re you’re threatening the safety of the country. So I’m opposed to that.

Interviewer: So does that mean that you feel like women are less capable than men? Because serve in the military?

Carlson: I didn’t say that. I said that they were making hiring decisions based on totally irrelevant criteria, like sex, race, or applying for a job and those are irrelevant. Your color or your gender does not make you a better or worse soldier, your ability does, period.

Interviewer: Do you think there are any differences between who you are as a person and who you are displayed as on TV? Or the media?

Carlson: I wouldn’t know because I don’t ever read anything about myself. I don’t have, as far as I’m concerned, e any views that are radical. I mean, I sort of believe in the basic stuff, you know, that you should never discriminate against people for how they look. And that you should always judge people based on what they do and who they are. And, you know, if people think that those views are crazy, I mean, I don’t really know what to say. That’s what I believe.